Engineering FAQ

For all your questions about UBC Engineering.


UBC Information

General Information

Prospective Students

UBC Engineering has various online resources available for prospective students interested in learning about our program:

  • UBC Undergraduate Programs offers an extensive overview of the undergraduate programs available at UBC, as well as information about applying, finances, campus tours, and more.
    • Using the Program search function, you find the engineering topics by filtering for Bachelor of Applied Science (Engineering)
  • Engineering UBC is an engineering-specific site for prospective students, which features in-depth guides to each program, admission information, and student experience.
  • UBC Engineering Youtube offers videos of past prospective student events, information about various programs, and videos from UBC engineering staff, faculty, and students.

UBC Student Card

The UBC card is a student identification card. This card is used during exams as identification, in student housing for identification and meal plans, and may be used for after-hours building access. Students should obtain their physical or digital card as soon as possible when they arrive on campus. For more information and to apply, please visit the UBCcard website.

International Students – Immigration, Study Permits, Visas

For all information about immigration, study permits, visas, or other immigration documents, please refer to Immigration UBC. If you have further questions, read through the International Student Guide, or contact International Student Advising.

Tuition, Scholarships, Bursaries

Your tuition information is found in your SSC. Several online payment options are available. For information about how tuition is calculated, please visit Undergraduate Tuition Fees.

Please contact your Enrolment Services Advisor for information about tuition, payments, scholarships, bursaries, or other financial inquiries.

If you have scholarship forms that need any official stamp for approval, please visit Enrolment Services.

Student Service Centre (SSC), Campus Wide Login (CWL), Current Contact Information

The Student Service Centre is an application used for applications, tuition, finances, grades, and much more. Students can access their SSC here.

If you are experiencing technical difficulties with your SSC, please contact ssc.help@ubc.ca.

Campus-Wide Login (CWL) is designed to give you access to UBC’s online applications with the same username and password. The CWL system provides access to many of the University’s online systems, such as the Student Service Centre, and Canvas.

UBC primarily communicates with students through email. It is very important that students keep their contact information up-to-date on the Student Service Centre (SSC).

U-Pass, Health and Dental Plan, Student Fees

Students at UBC pay a variety of student fees, which are used to give students a variety of resources, benefits, and services. You can find a fee breakdown at AMS Fees.

The U-Pass BC program is a subsidized transit pass program that provides post-secondary students with universal, accessible, and affordable access to public transit across Metro Vancouver. This is a monthly 3-zone pass for Metro Vancouver transit. To find out more, or to learn about U-Pass exemption, please visit AMS U-Pass BC.

The AMS/GSS Health & Dental Plan was designed by students for students to take care of expenses not covered by basic health care plans, such as British Columbia’s Medical Services Plan (MSP), equivalent provincial health care plans, and private basic plans. The comprehensive Plan covers prescription drugs, dental care, psychologist visits, travel health coverage, vision care, and much more. For more information or instructions for opting out of the student health plan, please visit Health and Dental AMS.

Canvas – UBC’s Primary Learning Platform

Canvas is UBC’s primary learning platform for delivering online course content. It includes features such as quizzes, assignments, discussions, and mobile apps. You can access Canvas at canvas.ubc.ca and log in with your CWL.

Several other learning tools including iClicker, WeBWorK, peerScholar, and ComPAIR are integrated with Canvas. You will learn if you need these for your courses in your course syllabi.

Software Available to UBC Engineering Students

Common engineering software (such as MATLAB and Solidworks) is installed in University Computer labs. There is also a variety of discounted and free software available to Engineering students.

Housing – UBC Residence and Off-Campus Housing Resources

For information about UBC Residence, please visit Student Housing UBC.

For information about finding housing off campus, please visit:

Health and Wellness

UBC offers a variety of resources to students for addressing mental and physical health concerns:

And many more. Please visit Health and Wellbeing or Campus Lightbox for a comprehensive list of wellness resources available to students.

Feeling overwhelmed by the number of resources? Please contact us if you need assistance navigating UBC to find the right resource for your situation.

If you need crisis support or you’re currently in distress, the following resources are available 24 hours/day, 7 days/week:

Getting Involved

UBC, AMS, and Engineering offer students many opportunities to go beyond the classroom. Get involved on campus:

  • Student Unions
    • The Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS) is the Engineering faculty’s student union, responsible for things such as the Engineering Reds, E Week, Christmas Caroling, and more. Learn about getting involved here.
    • The Alma Mater Society (AMS) is UBC’s student union. They run the UBC Nest, plan events such as Block Party and Welcome Back Barbeque, provide students with support, resources, and advocacy, run and fund student clubs, and much more. Learn about getting involved here.
  • Engineering Design Teams
    • At UBC, we have 35 different Engineering Design Teams where students volunteer their time to work collaboratively on design projects and gain hands-on experience. Learn more here.
  • Entrepreneurship
    • Explore entrepreneurship opportunities for engineering students here.
  • AMS Clubs
    • AMS offers a wide variety of clubs, ranging from sports, ethnic and religious societies, hobbies, non-profits, and much more. Learn more here.
  • Professional Development and Experiential Learning
    • UBC Applied Science’s Experiential Learning Hub (E-Hub) is designed to give students an edge in a constantly evolving job market through involvement in a variety of action-based programs and workshops. Here, students can discover and connect with hands-on learning opportunities that allow them to forge professional networks, enhance written and verbal communication skills, and upgrade their emotional intelligence and inclusive leadership abilities.
  • Recreational Sports

For more information on extra-curricular opportunities, please visit Get Involved on Campus.

Resources Available to UBC Students

There are a variety of resources available to UBC students, including:

  • AMS Support and Services
    • AMS Ombudsperson, SASC, U-Pass, Health Plan, resource groups, free menstrual products
  • Academic and Learning Resources
    • Library Services, peer coaches and tutors, study spaces
  • Student Support and Resources
    • Academics, money, health, career, and more
  • International Student Advising
    • If you have questions about life as an international student, International Student Advising is here to help. International Student Advisors are Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants (RCICs) or Regulated International Student Immigration Advisors (RISIAs) who can support you in your experience as a UBC international student.
  • Enrolment Services Advisors
    • If you are an undergraduate student in a degree program, you are assigned a dedicated Enrolment Services Advisor (ES Advisor) to help you navigate UBC. You can ask them questions on topics like making a budget, applying for loans, understanding UBC regulations and processes, and more. 
  • Centre for Accessibility
    • The Centre for Accessibility facilitates disability-related accommodations and programming initiatives designed to remove barriers for students with disabilities and ongoing medical conditions in all aspects of university life.
  • Indigenous Portal
    • Indigenous students collegium, orientations, indigenous student advising

New to UBC / Start of Term

What is Jumpstart?

If you are entering your first year at UBC Vancouver and coming directly from high school, you are eligible to register for Jump Start. The five-day program is designed to give you a first look at university life, let you meet your professors and academic community, and help you make your first friends at UBC Vancouver!

There are different programs designed for students staying in residence, and those commuting to campus throughout the year. Learn more at Jumpstart UBC.

What is Imagine Day?

On the first day of Winter Term 1, all classes are replaced by Imagine UBC Day with the single exception of those classes that start at or after 5:00 pm and meet only once per week.

You will have the chance to meet some great people including your Dean, some of your future professors, and other students. It will be an opportunity to learn about your new academic environment and the specific expectations of your faculty. Find out more at Imagine UBC.

What are UBC classes like? How will I be graded?

To learn about the typical course format, evaluation, and more, please visit Introduction to UBC Classes.

To learn about UBC’s grading practices, please visit Grades.

I have back-to-back classes. Will I have time to walk between them?

Classes at UBC run with 10 minute breaks at the end of the class periods. For example, a course scheduled from 1:00-2:00pm actually runs 1:00-1:50pm, with a 10 minute break to get between classes.

As UBC is a large campus, we would recommend checking your class locations to see if getting between classes is doable in 10 minutes.

I am coming to UBC in the fall. Are there any prep courses or self study I can do before I start?

UBC runs a few prep courses every year in Writing and Math through Academic Essentials.

EAS also recommends students self-study the C programming language if they have no prior coding experience.

When will I get my course syllabus?

Students will receive their course syllabi (a detailed course outline) on the first day of class from their professors. General course descriptions can be found on the SSC course pages.

For first-year engineering courses, more detailed course descriptions can be found in the Welcome to Engineering Handbook.

I want to buy my textbooks. How do I know what to buy? Where can I buy textbooks?

Course booklists can be found on the SSC > Course Schedule > Registration > Booklist. This will list the required textbooks for each course.

Textbooks can be ordered online or bought in person from the UBC Bookstore. You can also print your booklist at the UBC bookstore by scanning your student card, or entering your student number.

It is recommended to wait until class has started to buy textbooks, as the booklist may change.

What computer should I get? – Hardware and Software Requirements

Your computer should have high processing power, at least 5 GB of RAM, a moderate graphics card, and at least 125 GB of internal memory. The recommended operating system is PC.

Common engineering software (such as MATLAB and Solidworks) is installed in University Computer labs. There is also a variety of discounted and free software available to Engineering students.

How long do I have to add/drop/change classes?

Before the add/drop deadline of each term, you may add, drop, or change your courses on the Course Schedule without having the record of registration shown on your academic record. The add/drop deadline can be found on Course Change Dates.

I want to switch course sections/I have a registration request. Who do I contact?

For all course registration requests, including section switches, credit limit increases, or course conflicts, please refer to the Registration Requests page.

Please note there are eligibility requirements for these requests. We are unable to accommodate requests that do not meet the eligibility guidelines.

I may not get my study permit in time to start first year at UBC in September. What should I do?

Please Contact EAS.


Course Registration

General Registration Questions

What is a Standard Timetable (STT)?

An STT is a pre-planned timetable that incorporates most of the courses required for a program. You will be required to register for an STT before adding individual courses. All engineering students use a Standard Timetable (STT) to register for their core courses. You are registering for both term 1 and term 2 of the Winter Session. UBC will email you about two weeks before the start of registration notifying you that your registration date and time are available to view on the Student Service Centre (SSC).

How are registration times decided?

Registration times are staggered throughout the registration period based on year level and sessional average (or admissions average for new-to-program students).

When I test my registration I get an error message. What should I do?

First, please confirm the STT you are testing is the right STT for you. If you still receive an error message Contact Us for assistance. When possible, please include a screenshot of the error message.

The course I want to register in is marked as blocked/restricted. How do I register?

When registering, you may encounter course sections with different statuses.

  • Blocked: a course that is blocked from registration means students are not able to register themselves for the course. This may happen once a course becomes full and the waitlist opens, or if the course is reserved for students registered directly by the program. Students should check the section comments to see if there is a registration procedure (such as emailing the program) or register on the waitlist if one is available. If a waitlist section is blocked, this usually means there are still seats available in a section.
  • Restricted: a course marked restricted means that the remaining seats in the section are only available to students who meet certain eligibility criteria. You can find the restrictions on the section page under the Seat Summary. Please note that you are able to register for restricted sections if you match the restrictions.

The course I want is full. How do I register?

A course marked full means there are no seats remaining in the section. If your desired course section is full, you will need to find an alternative section, register on the waitlist, or continue to self-monitor the section to register when a seat becomes available.

There are courses in my STT section marked as restricted, blocked, or full. Does this mean the STT is full?

You should disregard the individual course statuses in your STT. The STT is available until the STT section is marked as full.

I want to register for a course, but it overlaps with another course. What should I do?

Registering in two overlapping courses is called a Course Conflict. Many faculties and departments do not allow course conflicts (all departments in the Faculty of Science such as biology, chemistry, math, and stat courses, and Commerce & Business Administration). First year students are not permitted to have any course conflicts.

For other year levels, please refer to the Registration Requests page for more details and the request form for Course Conflict.

How do I drop courses?

  1. On your SSC Course Schedule, navigate to “Registration > Add/Drop Courses”
  2. Select the course you wish to drop, and press “Drop Selected Section” or “Drop Selected STT Sections”
  3. **Do not press “Drop STT”, as this will deregister you from all your STT courses. Make sure you are selecting and dropping individual courses, not selecting and dropping your STT.

I want to switch sections in a course. How do I do this?

If there are available seats in a course and you are eligible for registration, you can use the section switch function on SSC. To do this, go to the Registration tab on SSC Course Schedule, and select Add/Drop Courses. On this page, select the course you wish to switch sections and select the Switch Selected Section button. You will be prompted to select the section you wish to switch into. Do not drop your course and attempt to register in another section. If you drop a course, you will be unable to register for it again. Students will need to register on a waitlist in this situation, and are not guaranteed a seat in the course.

If the section you wish to switch into is blocked or you are unable to register in it, you should check the section comments for the course. These comments will often give information about how a department handles section registration. For non-engineering courses, you should also check the department’s website for information about registration. Many departments will have information about how they handle section switches (this may be a form, a person to email, or details about the department not allowing switches).

If you are still unable to switch sections, you will need to request a section switch by filling out the Section Switch form. Please be aware the section switches are only granted for extenuating circumstances, and not all section switch requests will be accommodated.

Valid reasons for a section switch request:

  • Varsity athletic commitments – You are on a UBC Varsity athletic team and your timetable conflicts with practice times (please include your Varsity sport when contacting EAS)
  • Medical commitments – regularly scheduled medical commitments (appointments, etc.)
  • Extenuating circumstances
  • In rare circumstances, highly unbalanced timetables may be a valid reason for a section switch

Invalid reasons for a section switch request:

  • Instructor preferences
  • Employment commitments
  • Wanting to be in the same section as a friend
  • Time of day preferences

What is a waitlist? When are students moved off the waitlist?

Generally, a waitlist is opened when all the seats are full in a course. Students who register on the waitlist will then be moved into the course section as seats become available. Each department has its own priority guidelines for who will be moved off the waitlist first – usually having to do with specialization, year level, and registration date onto the waitlist. For this reason, it is difficult (if not impossible) to tell a student what “place” they are on a waitlist.

A waitlist does not guarantee a seat in a course. Seats in the course will only be given to students if the seat limit is increased, or a seat becomes available due to a student dropping the course.

Not all courses will offer waitlists. If the course you are wishing to register for is full and does not offer a waitlist, you will need to self-monitor the course and register when a seat becomes available.

EAS controls only the APSC course waitlists. Waitlist clearing for APSC courses usually begins 2 weeks before the start of term.

For questions about waitlists for non-APSC courses, please consult the course’s department website (i.e. the Math Department for MATH courses, the Journalism Department for WRDS 150B, etc.).

I have transfer credits – what can I do with them?

Visit Transfer Credits to learn more.

Who do I contact if I’m having registration issues?

For all First Year STT registration issues, please contact EAS.

For upper year registration issues, please contact your program advisor.

For non-engineering course registration issues, please contact the overseeing department of that course (Math Department for MATH courses, Psychology department for PSYC, etc.).

First Year Registration

Comprehensive information about First Year Registration:

Please refer to our First Year Registration Guide for a comprehensive look at first year registration, STT, additional courses, and more!

What is a worklist? How do I make one?

Worklists are draft class timetables that you can create before you register to help you plan out your courses.

After logging into the course schedule tool, you can create multiple worklists, in case one or more of the courses or STTs on your first worklist is full. To create a worklist, select “New worklist” from the right top sidebar. You will be able to see all of the worklists you have created. You can add lectures, standard timetables, and other course components to existing worklists. EAS recommends students make at least 4 worklists with different STTs, as many STTs will fill up quickly.

Please refer to Enrolment Service’s “How To Navigate a Worklist” video for more information.

How do I register for my courses?

For a demonstration of how to register using SSC, please refer to Enrolment Service’s “Course Registration Overview” video.

EAS is also holding virtual Registration Workshops in which we will go through the registration process.

I’m an incoming first year, what type of STT should I register in?

  • The majority of first year students will register in an HS Standard Time Tables. This is the timetable for students who have completed Pre-CALC 12 or equivalent.  
  • If you are deficient in required courses such as Physics or Chemistry 12, are interested in taking Honours Math, are a Varsity athlete, or have been accepted into the Pre-Biomedical Timetable, please refer to our High School Students: Year 1 page for detailed information about Standard Time Tables.  

How do I choose an HS STT section? How are they different? 

All the HS STTs contain the same courses, just delivered at different times of the day. You can choose whichever STT suits your schedule best. You may also want to consider which STT will fit your desired Humanities/Social Science elective and WRDS 150B section.  

What courses do I need in addition to my STT?

In addition to your STT, you will need to add a 3 credit Humanities and Social Science elective, and a 3 credit English/Communication course (WRDS 150B or equivalent, ENGL 100, 110, or 111).  You can find more information on the Course Planning page

How do I register for a non-STT course, such as a humanities course?

Option 1: Navigate to the course section page of the course you want. Click on the “Register Section” button on the top right corner of the page.


Option 2: If you made a worklist, select the individual courses on the worklist and press “Register Selected” at the bottom of the worklist screen.

What courses count towards the Humanities/Social Science Electives? What kind of courses are considered Humanities/Social Science? Can I use transfer credit towards H/SS? 

  • Broadly speaking, a Humanities course is about the study of human culture – the history, art, literature, music, etc. that define groups of people.  A Social Science is the study of society, with the main disciplines in social science being culture/social anthropology, sociology, psychology, political science, and economics. 
  • You can find the guidelines for H/SS and examples of approved courses chart on the Humanities and Social Science Elective page. Advanced credit eligibility is also listed in this chart.  
  • A maximum of 3 credits in a language course can be used towards the humanities and social sciences requirement.

What are some common Humanities/Social Science courses first year engineering students take? 

Most engineering students will choose to take an introductory 100-level Arts course for their Humanities/Social Science requirement. Common course examples would be PSYC 101 or 102, ECON 101 or 102, LING 100 or 101, etc. Students should be aware that upper level (300+) Arts courses often require heavy reading requirements and academic writing, which are rarely suitable for first year students.

Students may also choose to do a 3-credit language course to fulfill the requirement.

If a student is hoping to pursue a minor, they may also consider taking a course that can be used towards this.

Full STTs: What is a transitory STT? When should I register in one? 

When all the normal Standard Timetables (STT) are full, there will be
corresponding Transitory STTs for students to register in. These Transitory STTs include the courses without the meeting days and times. By registering in a Transitory STT, it shows your intention to attend UBC Engineering. You will receive your final timetable around mid-August.

I have advanced credits/transfer credits, what can I apply them towards? 

  • Please visit our Transfer Credit page for detailed information about how to apply advanced credits/transfer credits towards your Engineering degree requirements.
  • The following table outlines the first year engineering requirements. If you have been awarded transfer credits, you may be exempt from some courses.
    First-Year EngineeringEquivalent Transfer Credit
    APSC 100APSC 100
    APSC 101APSC 101
    APSC 160APSC 160
    CHEM 154CHEM 121 (CHEM 120 and CHEM 115) + CHEM 123 (CHEM 130 and CHEM 135) or CHEM 111 + 113
    MATH 100MATH 100, 102*, 104*, 120, 180 or 184*
    MATH 101MATH 101, 103*, 105* or 121
    MATH 152MATH 221 or 223
    PHYS 157, 158, & 159PHYS 117 + 118 +119
    PHYS 106/107 + 108 + 109
    PHYS 131 + 118 + 119
    PHYS 101 + 102
    PHYS 170PHYS 170
    WRDS 150ENGL 1st, 100, 110, 111, 112 or WRCM 1st (3 credits)
    Humanities and Social Science ElectiveSee Complementary Studies for details, and Humanities and Social Sciences Electives for course eligibility.
     
  • If you have transfer credits that will cover courses from your STT, please see “Dropping Courses” for instructions on how to drop the courses you no longer need. 
  • Before dropping any courses covered by advanced credits, please review the following information on How to apply AP, IB or A-Level Credits to the BASc Program 
  • Particularly for Math, Chemistry, and Physics, you may want to consider taking these courses in first year, even if you have credit for them.  The content of these courses is foundational to the remainder of the degree and so it is important to ensure you have the foundational content  

How do I drop courses I have transfer credits for?

  1. On your SSC Course Schedule, navigate to “Registration > Add/Drop Courses”
  2. Select the course you wish to drop, and press “Drop Selected Section”
  3. **Do not press “Drop STT”, as this will deregister you from all your STT courses. Make sure you are selecting and dropping individual courses, not selecting and dropping your STT.

I want to switch course sections, who do I contact?

If there are available seats in a course and you are eligible for registration, you can use the section switch function on SSC. To do this, go to the Registration tab on SSC Course Schedule, and select Add/Drop Courses. On this page, select the course you wish to switch sections and select the Switch Selected Section button. You will be prompted to select the section you wish to switch into. Do not drop your course and attempt to register in another section for STT courses. You can drop your non-STT courses (WRDS, Humanities) to register in another section if there are seats open. However, registration in the new section is not guaranteed.

For non-STT courses, if the section you wish to switch into is blocked or you are unable to register in it, you should check the section comments for the course. These comments will often give information about how a department handles section registration. You should also check the department’s website for information about registration. Many departments will have information about their registration policies on their websites.

For STT courses, please submit the First Year Section Switch form. Be aware that students in first year STTs are usually not permitted to switch sections unless they have extenuating circumstances. Please note that not all section switch requests will be accommodated. Do not drop a course section to attempt to register in a different section. If you drop a course, you will be unable to register for it again. Students will need to register on a waitlist in this situation, and are not guaranteed a seat in the course.

Valid reasons for a section switch request:

  • Varsity athletic commitments – You are on a UBC Varsity athletic team and your timetable conflicts with practice times (please include your Varsity sport when contacting EAS)
  • Medical commitments – regularly scheduled medical commitments (appointments, etc.)
  • Extenuating circumstances
  • In rare circumstances, highly unbalanced timetables may be a valid reason for a section switch

Invalid reasons for a section switch request:

  • Instructor preferences
  • Employment commitments
  • Wanting to be in the same section as a friend
  • Time of day preferences

Upper Year Registration

I just received my second-year placement. How do I register for my year 2 courses?

Find your program’s second year STT in BASc STT section of SSC and register in one of the available sections. The STT section page may have instructions for additional courses you must register for outside your STT.



You can also consult your program’s website for course lists. If you have questions about your program, please consult your program advisor.

The STT for my program is full. What do I do?

If the STT for your program is full, please contact your program advisor.

I don’t have all the pre-requisites for my upper-year STT. Who should I contact for course planning?

For upper year course planning, please contact your program advisor.


Degree Requirements and Academics

Finding Information

First Year Requirements

Students can find the full first year program on the Course Planning page.

Additionally, students can find program information relevant to their situation on the High School and Transfer Year 1 pages.

For any questions about first year requirements, please Contact EAS.

Second Year Placement

Please refer to Second Year Placement.

Complementary Studies Requirements

Students can find the complementary studies requirements for the BASc program on the Course Planning page.

For any questions about complementary studies requirements, please Contact EAS

Upper Year Program Requirements

Upper-year program requirements can be found on the program’s website or in the UBC Calendar.

For any questions about upper year program requirements, please contact your Program Advisor.

Minors and Dual Degree Requirements

Please refer to Minors and Dual Degree.

Academic Standing and Progression

Please refer to Academic Standing.

Tutoring, Study Groups, Academic Help

There are a variety of academic supports available to Engineering Students. Please refer to Academic Support for more information.

APSC 100/101 Equivalency

Interdepartmental Transfer

Please refer to Interdepartmental Transfer.

Common Questions and Issues

Who should I contact about First Year and Complementary Studies requirements if I have questions?

Please contact EAS if you have questions about first year or complementary studies requirements.

Who should I contact about Upper Year requirements if I have questions?

Please contact your program advisor if you have questions about upper year requirements.

I am going into my final year and want to check if I’ve fulfilled my graduation requirements. How do I do this?

EAS will conduct a preliminary check between mid-July and the end of August on the first year and complementary study requirements on students who are registered in Year 4 and 5 of the program. Students who may have a deficiency in these requirements will be notified. For other deficiencies or questions related to program-specific requirements in Year 2 and above, students are advised to see their program advisor.

If you have questions about graduation previous to this time, please contact EAS for your first year and complementary studies requirements, and your program advisor for upper year requirements.

My degree navigator isn’t showing courses correctly. What should I do?

If you have a credit (UBC course or transfer credit) that isn’t pulling into the correct slot on Degree Navigator, please contact EAS.

Not all humanities courses are programmed into DN. For this reason, you may find a humanities course that you have completed in the Unused Courses or Invalid Courses section at the bottom of the DN that has not been applied to the humanities section. Use the searchable approved list to check whether the course has been approved.

Most transfer credits should have already applied correctly on DN. If not, check the Unused Courses or Invalid Courses section again. If the course isn’t listed on your record, check if UBC has received the most updated transcript for an assessment by the Undergraduate Admissions Office. You may have completed a summer course prior to entering UBC, but have not sent the transcript.

If you have transferred from one of nine Engineering Transfer Program partners, your first year requirements are covered if you have completed the entire Engineering Transfer Program at your previous institution.

Camosun Bridge Program is a block transfer whereby transfer credits are not noted. Your DN will be updated manually by EAS during your graduation check review before your final year.

For other transfers, use the first-year equivalency chart under First-Year Requirements.

Can I take 2 different language classes to fulfill my humanities requirement?

No. You can only take a maximum of 3 credits of a language to apply towards your humanities requirement, even if the courses are in different languages.

I want to take time off from my degree. Is academic leave available to Engineering students?

Yes! Please refer to our Academic Leave page.

I have IB/AP/A level/Post Secondary transfer credits. How do I apply them?

Please refer to the Transfer Credits page.

I failed APSC 100/101 in first year/I am a year 2+ transfer student who doesn’t have credit for APSC 100/101. What should I do?

As APSC 100/101 are first year introduction to engineering courses, they aren’t relevant for upper year students. For this reason, upper year transfers and students who failed the course in first year are not required to retake the course. Instead, they will take equivalent upper year credits.

Please refer to APSC 100/101 Course Equivalencies for more details.

What is a W standing? – A guide to W Standing

  • Short answer: A W standing will replace the final grade on your transcript if you drop the course prior to the W deadline.
  • Long answer: Every course a student registers for will be permanently recorded on their UBC transcript. A student may withdraw from a course with a W standing, prior to the published deadline, usually set to the end of the sixth week after the beginning of classes.
    • A W standing will appear on the transcript, in place of a final grade. W standings are excluded from all GPA calculations. The W standing will remain on the student’s transcript, even if they repeat the course in a future term. No tuition refunds will be offered for withdrawn courses after the published deadlines.
What does a W mean for my long-term future?
  • The long-term impact of a W standing may be less dire than many students may think. While it is realistic to be concerned that taking a W could potentially add more time to complete your degree, it is much less likely to be impactful to your future employment prospects.
  • As for grad schools, one or two W grades on your transcript are unlikely to be viewed as a negative, especially considering the Engineering program’s heavy course load (and the COVID-19 pandemic we are all currently living through). However, a consistent pattern of W’s may signal trouble with time management or with anticipating workload.
  • If notice a pattern of W’s emerging on your transcript, consider meeting with your academic advisor prior to registration to build a more manageable course plan.
Should I take a W standing?

Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Have you tried UBC’s free resources for academic support?
  • Is this course a pre-requisite for any future courses I need to take?
    • If YES: when is the next Term this course will be offered? Check SSC to find out which Terms have offered this course in the past. An academic advisor’s help can be valuable to figure this out.
  • Do you know for certain that you are going to fail this course?
    • IF YES: What is your projected sessional average? Are you at risk of failed year standing?
      • IF YES: If failed year standing is a real possibility, a W standing may be better than an F grade.
      • IF NO: Consider attempting to complete the course.
        Think of it this way, if you take a W, you know for certain you will need to repeat the course. If you attempt to finish, there is still a chance that you can pass the course and remain on track to complete your degree on schedule.
  • Will dropping this course mean you no longer meet the definition of full-time enrollment, in order to maintain:
    • Your financial aid and/or awards?
    • Your UBC residence contract?
    • Your eligibility to work on/off-campus with your study permit?
    • Your eligibility for your post-graduation work permit?

Learn more: how to calculate your course load

The decision to take a W standing can be complex, but the good news is you don’t have to make this decision on your own. Academic advising is here to help you navigate your options, plus any concerns you may have about your academic progress. We look forward to meeting with you to help you make a confident decision about whether W standing is the right choice for you.

Does a W standing affect full-time enrolment status?

Withdrawing from a course also changes the number of credits a student is registered for, which could change their status from full-time enrolled to part-time enrolled. Maintaining full-time student status can be important for financial aid, awards, UBC residence contracts and international students with study permits.

Learn moreUBC enrollment definitions for immigration purposes

Does a W standing affect registration?

No credits will be granted for a course with W standing. A course with W standing cannot be used to meet pre-requisites for future courses. If you take a W for a required course, you will need to take that course again and start it from the beginning and pay tuition fees. Taking a W for a course can delay progression in your program, especially for Engineering students, which is why it may be helpful to consult with your program’s academic advisor first. Most Engineering courses are offered only once per year during Winter session, with few courses offered over the Summer.

For first year students, please note that in order to be eligible for second year placement, you must complete a minimum of 27 credits from the first year Engineering curriculum before April 30. We strongly recommend that you plan to complete all of your first year requirements as early as possible to keep pace with your program and build up a foundation for success in your upper level classes. Please note that only a limited selection of Engineering courses are offered during the Summer Term each year. Researching which courses were offered last Summer in SSC can help you make an informed plan.


Academic Concession

Standing Deferred Final Exams

When will I hear about the status of my request?

EAS requires a minimum of 5 business days to assess SD requests. It is normal to expect that you will not have an answer to your request in advance of the scheduled date of the final exam. Most requests will receive a response in 5-7 business days. Requests that require additional information or advising meetings may take longer to assess.

If your request is submitted by the end of term, you will receive a response to your request no later than:

  • Winter Term 1 (Sept-Dec): January 30
  • Winter Term 2 (Jan-Apr): May 30
  • Summer Term 1 (May-Jun): July 30
  • Summer Term 2 (Jul-Aug): September 30

Can my request be refused?

Academic concession requests may be refused on the following grounds:

  • you have made repeated requests for academic concession over multiple terms
  • you have already written the final exam
  • you did not make the request in a timely manner
  • if required, you have not provided supporting documentation to substantiate the request

All requests are considered on a case-by-case basis and the faculty reserves the right to deny a request.

Is there a deadline to apply for academic concession?

Requests for academic concession should be made as soon as possible, generally within 72 hours of the missed coursework. Concession requests should be made no later than:

  • January 31 – Winter Session, Term 1
  • May 31 – Winter Session, Term 2
  • September 30 – Summer Session (both terms)

When will the SD exam take place?

Unless otherwise arranged or stated on the UBC SD exam website, all standing deferred exams are coordinated centrally by Enrolment Services and are written during the Standing Deferred exam period (late July/early August for the winter session and November for the summer session).

Note: an alternate writing date can be earlier but not later than the official SD exam period offered by Enrolment Services

Dates for SD exam periods are found on the Student Services website.

Are all SD exams scheduled for the SD exam period? 

No. There are some courses that are scheduled differently. Please refer here to see Course Exceptions.  

Do I have to take the exam during the scheduled SD exam period? 

If you’ve been granted a Deferred Standing for a missed final exam, you’ll normally be expected to apply to write the SD exam during the official deferred exam period unless otherwise indicated by your instructor, your home advising office, or the department offering the course. While some instructors may be able to offer you an earlier opportunity to take a deferred exam, they are under no obligation to do so.  

Who schedules the SD exams?

For SD exams written in the SD exam period, enrolment services is in charge of creating the exam schedule. If you have questions or concerns, please contact them at student.exams@ubc.ca. For emergency Standing Deferred inquiries, please call 604-999-8135.

What happens if I am outside of BC/Canada during the time of the SD Exam?  

An off-campus exam is an option if you have Standing Deferred (SD) and you’re located outside Metro Vancouver during that period. Depending on your location, you might be able to write the exam in a UBC Partner Exam Centre or other off campus location. Not all departments will allow off campus exams. Please check with your instructor to see if your SD is eligible for this option.

Is there a deadline to complete my SD exam?

Students granted Deferred standing in Winter Session courses must complete all outstanding course requirements by August 23 of the following summer. Students granted Deferred standing in Summer Session courses must complete all outstanding work by December 25 of the same year. 

I am unable to attend my SD exam/I missed my SD exam. What should I do?

If you are unable to complete your standing deferred exam due to extenuating circumstances, you may appeal for additional academic concession. You must submit current documentation of your extenuating circumstances to support your appeal. In rare instances, you may be permitted to write a missed deferred exam, however, the instructor is under no obligation to offer another opportunity to write the incomplete exam and some are unable to offer this option due to departmental regulations. To submit an appeal for additional Academic Concession contact EAS directly.

If your standing deferred exam is not completed by the end of the SD period, the SD will be removed from your record and your sessional average will be calculated using all posted grades and a grade of 0 for any courses without a grade. Your sessional average will be recalculated if the course is later withdrawn or a change of grade is submitted.

How will having Standing Deferred exams affect course registration?

First-year students should be aware that receiving a Standing Deferred (SD) status may result in a delay in your second-year placement and the issuance of your Academic Standing. Students with SD exams can anticipate receiving the second-year placement notification in late August once the results of their exams and course grades have been finalized. Students will not be penalized in the placement process as a result of their SD standing, however you will not be able to register for the upcoming winter session until the placement is finalized which may limit your ability to register in your first-choice timetable and classes.

Upper-year students (years 2 – 5) should be aware that receiving a Standing Deferred (SD) status may result in a delay in the issuance of your Academic Standing. This means you may not be able to register for the upcoming winter session until the results of your exams and course grades have been finalized. This may limit your ability to register in your first-choice timetable and classes.

Please contact your program advisor for all upper year course registration issues.

How will having a Standing Deferred exam affect Second Year Placement?

First-year students should be aware that receiving a Standing Deferred (SD) status may result in a delay in your second-year placement and the issuance of your Academic Standing. Students with SD exams can anticipate receiving the second-year placement notification in late August once the results of their exams and course grades have been finalized. Students will not be penalized in the placement process as a result of their SD standing, however, you will not be able to register for the upcoming winter session until the placement is finalized which may limit your ability to register in your first-choice timetable and classes.

What if the course I have an SD in is a pre-requisite for next year’s courses?

When registration opens, and you have SD Exams Pending, you will not be able to register for courses if your SD courses are pre-requisites for any of the courses you are trying to register for. You will wait until mid to late August once all final grades for the exams are submitted and you have fulfilled the pre-requisite courses. Please refer here to check if your SD course is a pre-requisite for any of your second year courses. First Year Program > Pre-requisites for Engineering Programs. 

Example) You will not be able to register in MATH 253 if you have an outstanding SD in MATH 101

I am having issues accessing the Canvas course for my SD exam. Who should I contact?

Please contact EAS if you are having Canvas access issues.

In Term Concession

Who approves in-term concessions?

Instructors make decisions about in-term concessions. EAS is not involved in the decision-making for in-term concessions.

I haven’t heard back about my in-term concession. What should I do?

Please attempt to contact your instructor – by email, through Canvas, by visiting office hours, or after class time. As instructors can be very busy, please allow 5-7 business days for responses to emails.

If you have made attempts to contact your instructor but have been unsuccessful, please contact EAS. An advisor will attempt to contact the instructor on your behalf.

Does having in-term concessions disqualify me from getting a Standing Deferred final exam?

No, having in-term concessions will not disqualify you from getting an SD on your final exam. However, it will be considered when assessing your overall eligibility for an SD.

My course isn’t listed on the in-term academic concession form. What do I do?

The in-term academic concession form through EAS is only available for Engineering courses. For any courses outside Engineering, please contact your instructor directly.

Late Withdrawal

How will withdrawing from a course impact my academic standing?

Choosing to withdraw from a course may impact your eligibility for promotion or graduation.

What is a W standing? How could it affect me in the long term?

  • Short answer: A W standing will replace the final grade on your transcript if you drop the course prior to the W deadline.
  • Long answer: Every course a student registers for will be permanently recorded on their UBC transcript. A student may withdraw from a course with a W standing, prior to the published deadline, usually set to the end of the sixth week after the beginning of classes.
    • A W standing will appear on the transcript, in place of a final grade. W standings are excluded from all GPA calculations. The W standing will remain on the student’s transcript, even if they repeat the course in a future term. No tuition refunds will be offered for withdrawn courses after the published deadlines.
  • What does a W mean for my long-term future?
    • The long-term impact of a W standing may be less dire than many students may think. While it is realistic to be concerned that taking a W could potentially add more time to complete your degree, it is much less likely to be impactful to your future employment prospects.
    • As for grad schools, one or two W grades on your transcript are unlikely to be viewed as a negative, especially considering the Engineering program’s heavy course load (and the COVID-19 pandemic we are all currently living through). However, a consistent pattern of W’s may signal trouble with time management or with anticipating workload.
    • If notice a pattern of W’s emerging on your transcript, consider meeting with your academic advisor prior to registration to build a more manageable course plan.

Should I take a W for my course?

Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Have you tried UBC’s free resources for academic support?
  • Is this course a pre-requisite for any future courses I need to take?
    • If YES: when is the next Term this course will be offered? Check SSC to find out which Terms have offered this course in the past. An academic advisor’s help can be valuable to figure this out.
  • Do you know for certain that you are going to fail this course?
    • IF YES: What is your projected sessional average? Are you at risk of failed year standing?
      • IF YES: If failed year standing is a real possibility, a W standing may be better than an F grade.
      • IF NO: Consider attempting to complete the course.
        Think of it this way, if you take a W, you know for certain you will need to repeat the course. If you attempt to finish, there is still a chance that you can pass the course and remain on track to complete your degree on schedule.
  • Will dropping this course mean you no longer meet the definition of full-time enrollment, in order to maintain:
    • Your financial aid and/or awards?
    • Your UBC residence contract?
    • Your eligibility to work on/off-campus with your study permit?
    • Your eligibility for your post-graduation work permit?

Learn more: how to calculate your course load

The decision to take a W standing can be complex, but the good news is you don’t have to make this decision on your own. Academic advising is here to help you navigate your options, plus any concerns you may have about your academic progress. We look forward to meeting with you to help you make a confident decision about whether W standing is the right choice for you.

Does a W standing affect full-time enrolment status?

Withdrawing from a course also changes the number of credits a student is registered for, which could change their status from full-time enrolled to part-time enrolled. Maintaining full-time student status can be important for financial aid, awards, UBC residence contracts and international students with study permits.

Learn moreUBC enrollment definitions for immigration purposes

Does a W standing affect registration?

No credits will be granted for a course with W standing. A course with W standing cannot be used to meet pre-requisites for future courses. If you take a W for a required course, you will need to take that course again and start it from the beginning and pay tuition fees. Taking a W for a course can delay progression in your program, especially for Engineering students, which is why it may be helpful to consult with your program’s academic advisor first. Most Engineering courses are offered only once per year during Winter session, with few courses offered over the Summer.

For first year students, please note that in order to be eligible for second year placement, you must complete a minimum of 27 credits from the first year Engineering curriculum before April 30. We strongly recommend that you plan to complete all of your first year requirements as early as possible to keep pace with your program and build up a foundation for success in your upper level classes. Please note that only a limited selection of Engineering courses are offered during the Summer Term each year. Researching which courses were offered last Summer in SSC can help you make an informed plan.


Study Abroad, Coordinated International Experience, Co-op

Study Abroad Options

UBC students can experience studying abroad in a variety of ways, including Coordinated International Experience, Go Global Exchange, Research Abroad, and more.

Please refer to International Experiences for information about the variety of experiences available to UBC students.

For an in-depth comparison of the study abroad options for Engineering students, please refer to Current Students: International Experiences.

Coordinated International Experience

The CIE exchange program enables students to study for up to two terms at one of our international partner institutions while earning credits that can apply towards your UBC degree. CIE partner institutions all have world-class engineering programs and have been specially selected to complement your UBC studies. The CIE program offers a high level of support to students who are preparing to go abroad, and every effort is made to provisionally map how the courses you take at the partner institution will apply to your UBC degree before you depart.

Learn more at Coordinated International Experiences.

Engineering Co-op

The Engineering Co-op Program offered by the Faculty of Applied Science prepares students for the job market through valuable paid work experience. This optional addition to the BASc degree offers students a chance to work in a variety of industries directly related to their degree.

Learn more at Engineering Co-op.